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An Elite Plan For June Bass on Guntersville

Top pros tell how they fish Guntersville right now.
By Greg McCain

I spent a productive and informative afternoon with the California transplant, one of the burgeoning group of anglers from around the country who have relocated to the Guntersville area. Kevin, who grew up near San Diego, is among the young guns in the professional ranks, parlaying an FLW Forrest Wood Cup win in 2010 into a full-time professional career. He made the jump to the B.A.S.S. Elite Series this year after qualifying through last year’s Northern Opens.

Kevin and I tossed Yamamoto swimbaits on Owner heads, catching a steady supply of Guntersville largemouth from 2 to 4 pounds in about three hours of fishing. While we were not sight-fishing, the fish appeared to be male bass either guarding fry or cruising the flats around the islands in Alred Creek alongside Highway 431. The occasional fish could be seen chasing bait in the shallow water, and we picked up several of those single schoolers.

For June fishing on Guntersville, Kevin first looks to the first major structural feature adjacent to those same spawning flats.

“When June rolls around, the fish are done spawning; they are heading back out to those deep-water areas,” Kevin noted as we fished. “I’m going to focus my efforts on the entrances to the creeks and look for as many steep drops as I can find.

“I will look at my Navionics chip where the contour lines get really tight together. That’s a clear indication of where your deepest drops are going to be. You can sit outside in about 30 feet of water within a cast length of 6 feet of water or less.”

From that location, Kevin said he attempts to target the entire water column, mainly with a deep-diving crankbait, a single swimbait or a football jig.

“Throw it up on that ledge, and bring it down,” Kevin said. “You’re going to be able to fish the entire water column and pinpoint where the fish are holding.”

Kevin attempts to identify the position and in particular the depth the fish are holding on a specific day and then duplicate the setup as he moves around the lake.

Read the rest of the article originally published on Alabama Outdoor News website >